robots will be in retail stores sooner than you think

by:Petolar     2020-07-11
One of the biggest problems in retail today is how to deal with this brick. and-mortar store.
Retailers paint themselves in some ways as a corner: One thing that stores really can make them stand out online is employees-except that most retailers take too many employees away from stores, let customers take care of themselves.
If no one in the store helps you, when you can get a better experience with your computer at home, or more ironically, why come to the store? On the phone in the parking lot?
The question retailers are facing now is, will they increase their workforce in stores?
Will they add more labor to their stores and offer differentiated services that cannot be met online?
This will need to change the entire labor model of many retailers-from low wages, low training, high wages to high salaries, more training and less churn.
But now in the 21 st century, there is another option for retailers: robots.
In a retail environment, I do not advocate one position or another, supporting or opposing robots.
Ultimately, it is the customer\'s acceptance to decide whether the robot will become a regular device in the store.
But now retailers are trying something.
Quickly track inventory on shelves
Moving inventory environments often fail to handle the inventory location on the shelves well.
They know how much they sell, and when they don\'t sell what they should, they know more and more-often as a hint that the product is out of stock.
But in all directions
Actual inventory levels become very important in the channel era, especially if you want to commit
Store inventory to online shoppers.
The more uncertain you are about what\'s on the shelf, the less inventory you can commit to customers, and vice versa.
In fashion, retailers are turning to RFID as a way to track store inventory.
But physics is still a barrier in groceries and general goods.
Metal shelves, liquids, cans all block the signal, making it difficult to use RFID.
Retailers are looking for ways to solve these problems.
A potential solution: robots.
Target, for example, tested an inventory robot at a store in San Francisco.
Expectation: Troll store and identify empty spots on shelves.
Recycling inventory or ordering vending machines has been around for a long time, even machines that seem to be everywhere at the airport now.
In some ways, these functions are no different from the basic robot functions: the ability to go to a specific location in the machine, retrieve the item, and deliver it to the customer.
Best Buy tested at a store in New York and took this step further.
The robot Chloe there Retrieved CD, DVD and some accessories according to the order of 9 touch screens in the store.
Close management of high-
Theft of items has always been a challenge for retailers who must balance theft prevention and sales prevention.
The easiest way to prevent theft is to lock the item, which is also the best way to make sure that you will never sell any of the items because the consumer is unable to buy the product.
This is not a problem if you have a shop assistant to help retrieve high
Goods stolen by consumers.
But there are very few such store employees in stores that have long been understaffed.
Robots are always there.
At large exhibitions of the National Retail Federation, large exhibitions of retail and technology, there are several machines that can effectively achieve mass customization.
Part of the product is manufactured in a local environment.
This may be as simple as a blank metal water bottle that can be personalized in the engraving machine in the store, or it may be as complicated as a loom in the store \"printing\" custom sweater.
Between the two, there lived Gordon, a robot barista who made coffee drinks in San Francisco.
In some ways, these robots are more about looking at the cool elements of the robot\'s work than delivering customized products and services.
However, as mentioned in the Futurist article I linked to notes, robot baristas are faster than humans.
And you won\'t get your name wrong. Straight-
Up Employee replaclowe\'s is testing robots at 11 stores in San Francisco with the aim of serving \"customers and employees.
\"The purpose of the robot is to answer simple questions so that the store staff can provide a higher service
Service level, answer difficult questions.
After spending some time in the home improvement store, you will soon realize that most employees have to use \"where can I find . . . . . . \" Start by answering at least 50 questions an hour?
So there are some benefits to passing on these issues to automation stuff.
However, my question is, why do you need a physical machine to provide this kind of service when Siri
Like the interface in the mobile app, the same thing can be done-no matter where the consumer is in the store, they can access it at any time?
Personally, I spent a lot of time looking for an employee in my home improvement shop, he can answer the basic question of \"Where can I find it\" that I don\'t want to trade this experience for instead of a robot.
It\'s cute, but I can see that mobile technology will eventually pass.
The customer assistant will shut down the robot-
Products designed to help customers.
Wal-Mart filed a patent for itself.
Open shopping cart
Imagine a shopping cart, relatively unchanged, following you based on the connection to the mobile app, while avoiding other shoppers and their shopping carts as you cross the store.
Now you can freely pick up items from the shelves with both hands, or at least don\'t have to worry about what effort it takes to push a full cart.
There are more uses
Boxes of robots in the store.
But most importantly, retailers must distinguish between propaganda gimmicks and forcing themselves
High Service
Touch services may be necessary where robots can really distinguish.
Of all these examples above, the jury still does not know where they are each fall.
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