trash troubles: turning trash into treasuretrash troubles: turning trash into treasuretrash troubles: turning trash into treasure

by:Petolar     2020-07-31
Mascoka-only about 45 recyclable items from families across Ontario enter the waste recycling plant.
More than half of the city\'s garbage is landfill.
But if families start to recycle more, municipalities can reach an agreement with a new generation of entrepreneurs who understand that garbage is equal to the dollar.
The Bracebridge branch of BFI Canada collects urban garbage from mescaca, but it also collects recyclable materials and converts them into cash.
Paul Wills, division manager at BFI Canada, said the collected recyclable items were transported by truck to a factory in Bracebridge where they were classified, processed and sold.
\"Everything we sell goes back to the manufacture of the product,\" Wells said . \".
\"You buy all kinds of things every day made of recycled plastic.
He said: \"The fiber has also been transformed into many different products, such as newspaper, cardboard, and even the back of the roof tile.
The company entered into a contract with the municipality of the mascoka district to collect waste and recyclable items.
The income from processing recyclable items can be traced back to the area.
According to the staff, last year, the region received approximately $500,000 in revenue from the sale of processed recyclable items to offset the cost of waste management projects.
Wes Moore of Canada waste management, a private recycling and disposal company, said North American waste logistics contains valuables worth about $8 to $10 billion.
A major challenge for municipalities is to find a market for recyclable materials.
\"Recycling has been around for 30 years, but the problem is that the final market for many materials has not yet been established,\" Sharma said . \".
To 40 of recycled materials in North America will be shipped to China, India and South America where demand is growing.
But Wills says the whereabouts of recycled items depend on the market.
He said that for example, a company in Ontario used most of the pet plastics refurbished by mascoka for water bottles, while most of them were high
Density polyethylene plastics are mainly sold to two companies in Quebec.
Tin cans are shipped to a company in Ontario that code three to seven mixed plastics to some companies in North America, and Wells says aluminum is sent to a melting and crushing plant in New York state.
There is still a long way to go for the recycled paper in mascoka.
Paper brokers buy recycled materials and sell them to factories throughout North America and the Far East, Wells said.
\"Two and a half years ago, it was very difficult for us to pay the company and let them take it from us,\" he said . \".
But demand and supply have changed, Wells says.
The more garbage municipalities can sell, the less taxpayer dollars are spent on managing it.
This can lead to higher recovery rates and reduce pressure on landfill sites if consumers buy too.
The effort to treat waste as a resource rather than a problem also allows companies to convert waste into new products, a model called up-cycling.
Other companies are also dealing with household waste.
But these industries are still in their infancy and municipalities now need solutions.
Philip Bair, a professor at the University of Toronto, said burning could be a route that more communities are willing to take.
Only about waste in Ontario is now burned.
The only residential incinerator is Algonquin energy from Brampton waste disposal facility.
The plant burned about 500 tons of mainly residential waste, generating 9 megawatts of sustained energy, enough to power 5,000 to 6,000 households.
Tony White, commissioner of municipal engineering and public works in the mascoka district, said energyto-
Garbage facilities such as incinerators are a controversial topic.
These facilities use heat to extract energy from waste.
This energy generates steam and drives turbines to generate electricity.
\"It\'s kind of like gasoline --or coal-
\"In addition to the fact that the fuel is garbage, we have launched a power station,\" he said . \".
\"The problem with junk energy is the same as any hot process-people are skeptical about by-products.
\"One concern is air pollution, which may be caused by some chemical by-products, including something called fly ash,\" White said.
Fly ash is a light, dangerous material that spreads in the chimney and needs to be captured.
But he said he did not want to simplify the problem.
The area considers burning its municipal waste when dealing with its long-term wasterange solid-
The waste management plan, about five years ago, but White said such a facility would require more waste than it would have been generated in mascoka and would require a lot of money.
\"Unfortunately, these energy sourcesfrom-
\"The purchase, construction and operation of waste systems are often so expensive that small towns do have financial difficulties,\" he said . \".
At the same time, the waste management plan concludes that landfill sites are the best option for mascoka.
One of the most important solutions to today\'s landfill problems, experts say, is to force manufacturers to create more reusable products, a method known as the extension of producer responsibility.
\"EPR effectively turns what goes into waste logistics into a problem for people who put their products on the market,\" said Mark Winfield, professor of environmental studies at York University . \".
This is done by forcing manufacturers to redesign their products so that they can reuse them or require manufacturers and businesses to pay the government
Charge for products that are difficult to recycle.
Ontario may develop an EU-like extension of producer responsibility policy, which forces producers to make it easier for cars and packaging to take apart parts that can be reused, Winfield said.
But there is no progress in this policy in Ontario.
Mascoka-only about 45 recyclable items from families across Ontario enter the waste recycling plant.
More than half of the city\'s garbage is landfill.
But if families start to recycle more, municipalities can reach an agreement with a new generation of entrepreneurs who understand that garbage is equal to the dollar.
The Bracebridge branch of BFI Canada collects urban garbage from mescaca, but it also collects recyclable materials and converts them into cash.
Paul Wills, division manager at BFI Canada, said the collected recyclable items were transported by truck to a factory in Bracebridge where they were classified, processed and sold.
\"Everything we sell goes back to the manufacture of the product,\" Wells said . \".
\"You buy all kinds of things every day made of recycled plastic.
He said: \"The fiber has also been transformed into many different products, such as newspaper, cardboard, and even the back of the roof tile.
The company entered into a contract with the municipality of the mascoka district to collect waste and recyclable items.
The income from processing recyclable items can be traced back to the area.
According to the staff, last year, the region received approximately $500,000 in revenue from the sale of processed recyclable items to offset the cost of waste management projects.
Wes Moore of Canada waste management, a private recycling and disposal company, said North American waste logistics contains valuables worth about $8 to $10 billion.
A major challenge for municipalities is to find a market for recyclable materials.
\"Recycling has been around for 30 years, but the problem is that the final market for many materials has not yet been established,\" Sharma said . \".
To 40 of recycled materials in North America will be shipped to China, India and South America where demand is growing.
But Wills says the whereabouts of recycled items depend on the market.
He said that for example, a company in Ontario used most of the pet plastics refurbished by mascoka for water bottles, while most of them were high
Density polyethylene plastics are mainly sold to two companies in Quebec.
Tin cans are shipped to a company in Ontario that code three to seven mixed plastics to some companies in North America, and Wells says aluminum is sent to a melting and crushing plant in New York state.
There is still a long way to go for the recycled paper in mascoka.
Paper brokers buy recycled materials and sell them to factories throughout North America and the Far East, Wells said.
\"Two and a half years ago, it was very difficult for us to pay the company and let them take it from us,\" he said . \".
But demand and supply have changed, Wells says.
The more garbage municipalities can sell, the less taxpayer dollars are spent on managing it.
This can lead to higher recovery rates and reduce pressure on landfill sites if consumers buy too.
The effort to treat waste as a resource rather than a problem also allows companies to convert waste into new products, a model called up-cycling.
Other companies are also dealing with household waste.
But these industries are still in their infancy and municipalities now need solutions.
Philip Bair, a professor at the University of Toronto, said burning could be a route that more communities are willing to take.
Only about waste in Ontario is now burned.
The only residential incinerator is Algonquin energy from Brampton waste disposal facility.
The plant burned about 500 tons of mainly residential waste, generating 9 megawatts of sustained energy, enough to power 5,000 to 6,000 households.
Tony White, commissioner of municipal engineering and public works in the mascoka district, said energyto-
Garbage facilities such as incinerators are a controversial topic.
These facilities use heat to extract energy from waste.
This energy generates steam and drives turbines to generate electricity.
\"It\'s kind of like gasoline --or coal-
\"In addition to the fact that the fuel is garbage, we have launched a power station,\" he said . \".
\"The problem with junk energy is the same as any hot process-people are skeptical about by-products.
\"One concern is air pollution, which may be caused by some chemical by-products, including something called fly ash,\" White said.
Fly ash is a light, dangerous material that spreads in the chimney and needs to be captured.
But he said he did not want to simplify the problem.
The area considers burning its municipal waste when dealing with its long-term wasterange solid-
The waste management plan, about five years ago, but White said such a facility would require more waste than it would have been generated in mascoka and would require a lot of money.
\"Unfortunately, these energy sourcesfrom-
\"The purchase, construction and operation of waste systems are often so expensive that small towns do have financial difficulties,\" he said . \".
At the same time, the waste management plan concludes that landfill sites are the best option for mascoka.
One of the most important solutions to today\'s landfill problems, experts say, is to force manufacturers to create more reusable products, a method known as the extension of producer responsibility.
\"EPR effectively turns what goes into waste logistics into a problem for people who put their products on the market,\" said Mark Winfield, professor of environmental studies at York University . \".
This is done by forcing manufacturers to redesign their products so that they can reuse them or require manufacturers and businesses to pay the government
Charge for products that are difficult to recycle.
Ontario may develop an EU-like extension of producer responsibility policy, which forces producers to make it easier for cars and packaging to take apart parts that can be reused, Winfield said.
But there is no progress in this policy in Ontario.
Mascoka-only about 45 recyclable items from families across Ontario enter the waste recycling plant.
More than half of the city\'s garbage is landfill.
But if families start to recycle more, municipalities can reach an agreement with a new generation of entrepreneurs who understand that garbage is equal to the dollar.
The Bracebridge branch of BFI Canada collects urban garbage from mescaca, but it also collects recyclable materials and converts them into cash.
Paul Wills, division manager at BFI Canada, said the collected recyclable items were transported by truck to a factory in Bracebridge where they were classified, processed and sold.
\"Everything we sell goes back to the manufacture of the product,\" Wells said . \".
\"You buy all kinds of things every day made of recycled plastic.
He said: \"The fiber has also been transformed into many different products, such as newspaper, cardboard, and even the back of the roof tile.
The company entered into a contract with the municipality of the mascoka district to collect waste and recyclable items.
The income from processing recyclable items can be traced back to the area.
According to the staff, last year, the region received approximately $500,000 in revenue from the sale of processed recyclable items to offset the cost of waste management projects.
Wes Moore of Canada waste management, a private recycling and disposal company, said North American waste logistics contains valuables worth about $8 to $10 billion.
A major challenge for municipalities is to find a market for recyclable materials.
\"Recycling has been around for 30 years, but the problem is that the final market for many materials has not yet been established,\" Sharma said . \".
To 40 of recycled materials in North America will be shipped to China, India and South America where demand is growing.
But Wills says the whereabouts of recycled items depend on the market.
He said that for example, a company in Ontario used most of the pet plastics refurbished by mascoka for water bottles, while most of them were high
Density polyethylene plastics are mainly sold to two companies in Quebec.
Tin cans are shipped to a company in Ontario that code three to seven mixed plastics to some companies in North America, and Wells says aluminum is sent to a melting and crushing plant in New York state.
There is still a long way to go for the recycled paper in mascoka.
Paper brokers buy recycled materials and sell them to factories throughout North America and the Far East, Wells said.
\"Two and a half years ago, it was very difficult for us to pay the company and let them take it from us,\" he said . \".
But demand and supply have changed, Wells says.
The more garbage municipalities can sell, the less taxpayer dollars are spent on managing it.
This can lead to higher recovery rates and reduce pressure on landfill sites if consumers buy too.
The effort to treat waste as a resource rather than a problem also allows companies to convert waste into new products, a model called up-cycling.
Other companies are also dealing with household waste.
But these industries are still in their infancy and municipalities now need solutions.
Philip Bair, a professor at the University of Toronto, said burning could be a route that more communities are willing to take.
Only about waste in Ontario is now burned.
The only residential incinerator is Algonquin energy from Brampton waste disposal facility.
The plant burned about 500 tons of mainly residential waste, generating 9 megawatts of sustained energy, enough to power 5,000 to 6,000 households.
Tony White, commissioner of municipal engineering and public works in the mascoka district, said energyto-
Garbage facilities such as incinerators are a controversial topic.
These facilities use heat to extract energy from waste.
This energy generates steam and drives turbines to generate electricity.
\"It\'s kind of like gasoline --or coal-
\"In addition to the fact that the fuel is garbage, we have launched a power station,\" he said . \".
\"The problem with junk energy is the same as any hot process-people are skeptical about by-products.
\"One concern is air pollution, which may be caused by some chemical by-products, including something called fly ash,\" White said.
Fly ash is a light, dangerous material that spreads in the chimney and needs to be captured.
But he said he did not want to simplify the problem.
The area considers burning its municipal waste when dealing with its long-term wasterange solid-
The waste management plan, about five years ago, but White said such a facility would require more waste than it would have been generated in mascoka and would require a lot of money.
\"Unfortunately, these energy sourcesfrom-
\"The purchase, construction and operation of waste systems are often so expensive that small towns do have financial difficulties,\" he said . \".
At the same time, the waste management plan concludes that landfill sites are the best option for mascoka.
One of the most important solutions to today\'s landfill problems, experts say, is to force manufacturers to create more reusable products, a method known as the extension of producer responsibility.
\"EPR effectively turns what goes into waste logistics into a problem for people who put their products on the market,\" said Mark Winfield, professor of environmental studies at York University . \".
This is done by forcing manufacturers to redesign their products so that they can reuse them or require manufacturers and businesses to pay the government
Charge for products that are difficult to recycle.
Ontario may develop an EU-like extension of producer responsibility policy, which forces producers to make it easier for cars and packaging to take apart parts that can be reused, Winfield said.
But there is no progress in this policy in Ontario.
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